Archives for the ‘Copywriting’ Category

12 Oct 2017
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A tale of two landing pages

Two landing pages: one bad, one good.

This week I was lured in by effective marketing via Facebook. They got me you guys.  There, I discovered two very different landing pages.

Let’s start with the bad. Read more →

14 Jul 2017
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Kid Word Mangling: Adorable Ways Kids Get Words Wrong

The best thing about having kids is the delightful way they mangle words. Forget cuddles, kisses and tickles.  Adorable toddler speak is the winner for me.*

Word mangling melts my heart and tickles my funny bone. Alice (now seven) called butterflies butt flies. Read more →

20 Sep 2016
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Why I don’t ask for a copywriting brief

Here’s a scenario:

You hire a copywriter because you need professional writing. You’re either no good at writing or too busy to get your website, blog or content written.

What’s the first thing the new copywriter asks you to do?

Write a copywriting brief!

Mental. Read more →

18 Sep 2015
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Five dud words and phrases that I’ve ditched from my writing

Five duds that I’ve banished from my writing

by Kate Merryweather, Melbourne website copywriter

 

Dear writers,

Don’t get it right, get it written, that’s my writing rule. I bash out my copy quick smart, then go back and delete, refine and polish till it’s as sparkly as Gina Liano’s stilettos.

 

Gina Liano

Did I just compare my writing to Gina Liano? Yes I did. Was that wise? No.

Read more →

11 Sep 2015
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Writing and blogging tips from The Bachelor

Writing and blogging tips from The Bachelor

by Kate Merryweather, Melbourne website copywriter

 

I do so very much love The Bachelor. As tempted as I am to download all my fangirl crushes on Heather, I’m sticking to the title of this blog post.
So, I hear you ask, what can be learned about writing from The Bachelor? Read more →

27 Mar 2015
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When clients want bad copywriting

by Kate Merryweather, Melbourne website copywriter

Clients are great! They pay my bills. I love my clients.

But.

Sometimes clients take my copy and make it boring. They take out the colour, the pithy comments, the spark. (No humility from this website copywriter.)

Some clients just want standard, corporate style copy. Read more →

Copywriting, Writing

No tags here

10 Dec 2013
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The best website copywriting tool ever

The humble ruler

It’s hard to spot errors in your own work.  Your brain is already familiar with the content so it naturally skims, not reading words properly and therefore not noticing typing errors and—gasp—misplaced apostrophes.

Read more →

16 Jul 2013
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Kids say the darndest things: how my kids help my writing

My kids often muddle up their words and come out with the best lines.

my little superheroes help my writing

my little superheroes help my writing

They give me great inspiration for finding creative turns of phrase.   As a website copywriter it’s easy to get distracted into finding keyword placement opportunities and forget about readability.   Our friends at Google are rewarding good content, so it’s more important than ever to make sure my writing is fresh, original and, well, good quality.

Read more →

14 May 2013
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People who write good

No sharing of advice and insights in this blog post.

From time to time, every blogger should produce a self-indulgent post, raving about inspiring, awesome people.

This is my turn.  These people would be ideal web copywriters for Dot Com Words, but probably have other things to do.

These wordsmiths are gut-thumpingly terrific and I heart them.

Read more →

30 Nov 2012
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Seven common mistakes with quotations

Quotes are great. Not only do quotes give you an excellent score if you play it on Words with Friends on a triple word square, they also are good for your online content.

Quotes add a bit of oomph.   Especially if you’ve gone to the trouble to source an interesting and clever speaker.

But it’s easy to get quotes wrong.  Here’s the top things to avoid:

1)     Quoting the wrong person
Some organisations have a protocol around quotes.  So only the Lord Mayor or the Chief of Defence or the Managing Director can be quoted in official communications.  That’s often just fine. But sometimes they are not the most relevant person to quote.   You need the designer, the festival directory  or the HR chick—the interesting person.  The person that adds the most credibility and gravitas is the one who should be quoted, not the person listed in the rulebook.

Read more →

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